Nelson Martinez To Replace Thomas Hampson In Verdi’s ‘La Traviata’

Metropolitan Opera/MIA Artist

Nelson Martínez will sing the role of Giorgio Germont in tonight’s performance of Verdi’s “La Traviata” at the Metropolitan Opera

The Cuban baritone will replace the originally scheduled Thomas Hampson, who is ill.

Martínez made his Metropolitan Opera debut this season in the role of Monterone in Verdi’s “Rigoletto.” Born in Cuba, he graduated from the Superior Institute of the Arts and became the leading baritone with the Teatro Lirico “Rodrigo Prats” in Holguin.

He later joined the Teatro Lirico Nacional in Havana, where he performed such roles as Enrico in Donizetti’s “Lucia di Lammermoor”, Marcello in Puccini’s “La Bohème” and many other leading baritone roles.

He is also an advocate for Zarzuela and has performed such famed works as “El Cafetal”, “Cecilia Valdes”, “Maria la O”, “La del Manojo de Rosas”, “La Leyenda del Beso”, “La del Soto del Parral”, and “Luisa Fernanda”. This season he performed extensively with the Miami Lyric Opera.

Martínez will join Sonya Yoncheva and Michael Fabiano in the performance which will be conducted by Nicola Luisotti.

Hampson is scheduled to return to the role of Germont on March 4 and will perform through the 25.

About the Author

Francisco Salazar
FRANCISCO SALAZAR, (Publisher) worked as a reporter for Latin Post where he has had the privilege of interviewing numerous opera stars including Anita Rachvelshvili and Ailyn Perez. He also worked as an entertainment reporter where he covered the New York and Tribeca Film Festivals and interviewed many celebrities such as Antonio Banderas, Edgar Ramirez and Benedict Cumberbatch. He currently freelances for Remezcla. He holds a Masters in Media Management from the New School and a Bachelor's in Film Production and Italian studies from Hofstra University.

1 Comment on "Nelson Martinez To Replace Thomas Hampson In Verdi’s ‘La Traviata’"

  1. …and what a fine job he did! Bravo.

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